Anda Mencari Menerima Jasa Konsultan ISO 9001 di Lombok Tengah Kami Solusinya Hubungi : 0857 1027 2813 konsultaniso9001.net adalah Jasa Konsultan ISO 9001, Consultant ISO 14001, Konsultan ISO 22000, OHSAS 18001, Penyusunan Dokumen CSMS-K3LL, K3, ISO/TS 16949,Dll yang BERANI memberikan JAMINAN KELULUSAN & MONEYBACK GUARANTEE ( Tanpa Terkecuali ) yang tertuang dalam kontrak kerja. Sebagai Konsultan ISO dan HSE TERBAIK dan BERPENGALAMAN kami siap membantu perusahaan bapak dan ibu dalam membangun sistem manajemen ISO dan HSE dengan pendekatan yang sistematis tanpa ribet dengan tujuan bagaimana sistem ISO tersebut bisa bermanfaat bagi perkembangan perusahaan serta menjadi pondasi yang kuat untuk kemajuan perusahaan.

Menerima Jasa Konsultan ISO 9001 di Lombok Tengah Melalui berbagai TRAINING ISO yang diselenggarakan menggunakan Metode Accelerated Learning, sehingga Karyawan Dipacu untuk lebih aktif dalam pembelajaran sehingga dapat menerapkan Sistem ini dengan Baik Nantinya. Menerima Jasa Konsultan ISO 9001 di Lombok Tengah

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Konsultan ISO 9001 | Menerima Jasa Konsultan ISO 9001 di Lombok Tengah

Jasa Training ISO 27001 di Pariaman

Jasa Training ISO 27001 di Pariaman | Hubungi : 0857 1027 2813 PT Bintang Solusi Utama adalah Jasa Konsultan ISO 9001, Consultant ISO 14001, Konsultan ISO 22000, OHSAS 18001, Penyusunan Dokumen CSMS-K3LL, K3, ISO/TS 16949,Dll yang BERANI memberikan JAMINAN KELULUSAN & MONEYBACK GUARANTEE ( Tanpa Terkecuali ) yang tertuang dalam kontrak kerja. Sebagai Konsultan ISO dan HSE TERBAIK dan BERPENGALAMAN kami siap membantu perusahaan bapak dan ibu dalam membangun sistem manajemen ISO dan HSE dengan pendekatan yang sistematis tanpa ribet dengan tujuan bagaimana sistem ISO tersebut bisa bermanfaat bagi perkembangan perusahaan serta menjadi pondasi yang kuat untuk kemajuan perusahaan. Jasa Training ISO 27001 di Pariaman

  Positif Thinking "... Indeed, Allah will not change the fate of a people unless they themselves ch

 



"... Indeed, Allah will not change the fate of a people unless they themselves change the state of his soul ..." Surah Ar-Rad 13:11 -

Truly a statement, an event, or even a piece of a sentence may affect a person's way of thinking, I give examples of the following story:

A father with three small children entering the night train, and there are already many people who are fast asleep, the middle of the night, when people fall asleep, the three children misbehave, they disturb the sleeping passengers. a few moments later there are men who rebuked her father. "I'm sorry, but your son is really naughty, they would not really unsettle the passengers?" then there are women who adds "Do not you feel guilty for your children's behavior?" as did the other passengers, they are grumbling about the behavior of three children. The father then said quietly apologized, "forgive us, in fact the children are not naughty, just that they are so since 1 hour ago because his mother had died." all passengers just snapped, their anger turns into compassion towards the children.

 

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Malem ini aku mulai lapar, seiring dengan itu aku kembali pada tempat nyamanku tempat yang mereka anggap aneh, ambigu, abstark

Malem ini aku mulai lapar,
seiring dengan itu aku kembali pada tempat nyamanku
tempat yang mereka anggap aneh, ambigu, abstark
atau apapun yang mereka katakan

alunan musik dari si gudang vidio 'youtube'
memberi makanan terhadap telingaku,
namun kusadari banyak dari elemen tubuhku yang kelaparan
sembari mendengar, aku mengucap, aku juga menulis

''Awalnya ku tak mengerti apa yang sedang kurasakan
Segalanya berubah dan rasa rindu itu pun ada
Sejak kau hadir disetiap malam ditidurku
Aku tahu sesuatu sedang terjadi padaku

Sudah sekian lama kualami pedih putus cinta
Dan mulai terbiasa hidup sendiri tanpa asmara
Dan hadirmu membawa cinta sembuhkan lukaku
Kau berbeda dari yang kukira

Aku jatuh cinta kepada dirinya
Sungguh-sungguh cinta
Oh apa adanya

Tak pernah kuragu
Namun tetap selalu menunggu
Sungguh aku…
Jatuh cinta kepadanya

Coba-coba dengarkan apa yang ingin aku katakan
Yang selama ini sungguh telah lama terpendam
Aku tak percaya membuatku tak berdaya
Tuk ungkapkan apa yang kurasa

Kadang aku cemburu
Kadang aku gelisah
Seringnya ku tak mampu lalui hariku
Tak dapat kupungkiri
Hatiku yang terdalam
Betapa aku jatuh cinta kepadanya''

Yang jadi pertanyaan adalah,
"emang aku bisa berucap merdu?"
"emang punya buku buat ditulis?"

tentu tak merdu, juga tak aku punya selembar kertaspun untuk kucoret.
tp aku kan ndak peduli nasib pendengar, salah siapa mendengar. :D
Jelas aku tak menulis di buku, aku menuliskan disini,
yups, disini, ditempat kau membaca tulisan ini.

namun aku juga share kepada beberapa orang normal.
kau tau reaksi mereka??
walah, macem2. mulai "sedih", "dieeemm", "badaaii bangau(yg ini aku tak tau)", "ada yang ngajakin duet lagu -sang kodok-" , "kenyih", "gini nih kalo udh masuk idol", "jangan dengerin dia. bisa gilaa ntar kalian".

dan ketika aku sudah ditemani makan, semuanya berhenti,
aku sudah kenyang, kuakhiri jua tulisanku bersama dengan berakhirnya laparku.

selamat malam,

#hanya sebuah tulisan untuk nutrisi jiwaku

 

WASHINGTON — The last three men to win the Republican nomination have been the prosperous son of a president (George W. Bush), a senator who could not recall how many homes his family owned (John McCain of Arizona; it was seven) and a private equity executive worth an estimated $200 million (Mitt Romney).

The candidates hoping to be the party’s nominee in 2016 are trying to create a very different set of associations. On Sunday, Ben Carson, a retired neurosurgeon, joined the presidential field.

Senator Marco Rubio of Florida praises his parents, a bartender and a Kmart stock clerk, as he urges audiences not to forget “the workers in our hotel kitchens, the landscaping crews in our neighborhoods, the late-night janitorial staff that clean our offices.”

Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin, a preacher’s son, posts on Twitter about his ham-and-cheese sandwiches and boasts of his coupon-clipping frugality. His $1 Kohl’s sweater has become a campaign celebrity in its own right.

Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky laments the existence of “two Americas,” borrowing the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s phrase to describe economically and racially troubled communities like Ferguson, Mo., and Detroit.

Photo
 
Senator Marco Rubio of Florida praises his parents, a bartender and a Kmart stock clerk. Credit Joe Raedle/Getty Images

“Some say, ‘But Democrats care more about the poor,’ ” Mr. Paul likes to say. “If that’s true, why is black unemployment still twice white unemployment? Why has household income declined by $3,500 over the past six years?”

We are in the midst of the Empathy Primary — the rhetorical battleground shaping the Republican presidential field of 2016.

Harmed by the perception that they favor the wealthy at the expense of middle-of-the-road Americans, the party’s contenders are each trying their hardest to get across what the elder George Bush once inelegantly told recession-battered voters in 1992: “Message: I care.”

Their ability to do so — less bluntly, more sincerely — could prove decisive in an election year when power, privilege and family connections will loom large for both parties.

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Questions of understanding and compassion cost Republicans in the last election. Mr. Romney, who memorably dismissed the “47 percent” of Americans as freeloaders, lost to President Obama by 63 percentage points among voters who cast their ballots for the candidate who “cares about people like me,” according to exit polls.

And a Pew poll from February showed that people still believe Republicans are indifferent to working Americans: 54 percent said the Republican Party does not care about the middle class.

That taint of callousness explains why Senator Ted Cruz of Texas declared last week that Republicans “are and should be the party of the 47 percent” — and why another son of a president, Jeb Bush, has made economic opportunity the centerpiece of his message.

With his pedigree and considerable wealth — since he left the Florida governor’s office almost a decade ago he has earned millions of dollars sitting on corporate boards and advising banks — Mr. Bush probably has the most complicated task making the argument to voters that he understands their concerns.

On a visit last week to Puerto Rico, Mr. Bush sounded every bit the populist, railing against “elites” who have stifled economic growth and innovation. In the kind of economy he envisions leading, he said: “We wouldn’t have the middle being squeezed. People in poverty would have a chance to rise up. And the social strains that exist — because the haves and have-nots is the big debate in our country today — would subside.”

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Who Is Running for President (and Who’s Not)?

Republicans’ emphasis on poorer and working-class Americans now represents a shift from the party’s longstanding focus on business owners and “job creators” as the drivers of economic opportunity.

This is intentional, Republican operatives said.

In the last presidential election, Republicans rushed to defend business owners against what they saw as hostility by Democrats to successful, wealthy entrepreneurs.

“Part of what you had was a reaction to the Democrats’ dehumanization of business owners: ‘Oh, you think you started your plumbing company? No you didn’t,’ ” said Grover Norquist, the conservative activist and president of Americans for Tax Reform.

But now, Mr. Norquist said, Republicans should move past that. “Focus on the people in the room who know someone who couldn’t get a job, or a promotion, or a raise because taxes are too high or regulations eat up companies’ time,” he said. “The rich guy can take care of himself.”

Democrats argue that the public will ultimately see through such an approach because Republican positions like opposing a minimum-wage increase and giving private banks a larger role in student loans would hurt working Americans.

“If Republican candidates are just repeating the same tired policies, I’m not sure that smiling while saying it is going to be enough,” said Guy Cecil, a Democratic strategist who is joining a “super PAC” working on behalf of Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Republicans have already attacked Mrs. Clinton over the wealth and power she and her husband have accumulated, caricaturing her as an out-of-touch multimillionaire who earns hundreds of thousands of dollars per speech and has not driven a car since 1996.

Mr. Walker hit this theme recently on Fox News, pointing to Mrs. Clinton’s lucrative book deals and her multiple residences. “This is not someone who is connected with everyday Americans,” he said. His own net worth, according to The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, is less than a half-million dollars; Mr. Walker also owes tens of thousands of dollars on his credit cards.

Continue reading the main story

But showing off a cheap sweater or boasting of a bootstraps family background not only helps draw a contrast with Mrs. Clinton’s latter-day affluence, it is also an implicit argument against Mr. Bush.

Mr. Walker, who featured a 1998 Saturn with more than 100,000 miles on the odometer in a 2010 campaign ad during his first run for governor, likes to talk about flipping burgers at McDonald’s as a young person. His mother, he has said, grew up on a farm with no indoor plumbing until she was in high school.

Mr. Rubio, among the least wealthy members of the Senate, with an estimated net worth of around a half-million dollars, uses his working-class upbringing as evidence of the “exceptionalism” of America, “where even the son of a bartender and a maid can have the same dreams and the same future as those who come from power and privilege.”

Mr. Cruz alludes to his family’s dysfunction — his parents, he says, were heavy drinkers — and recounts his father’s tale of fleeing Cuba with $100 sewn into his underwear.

Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey notes that his father paid his way through college working nights at an ice cream plant.

But sometimes the attempts at projecting authenticity can seem forced. Mr. Christie recently found himself on the defensive after telling a New Hampshire audience, “I don’t consider myself a wealthy man.” Tax returns showed that he and his wife, a longtime Wall Street executive, earned nearly $700,000 in 2013.

The story of success against the odds is a political classic, even if it is one the Republican Party has not been able to tell for a long time. Ronald Reagan liked to say that while he had not been born on the wrong side of the tracks, he could always hear the whistle. Richard Nixon was fond of reminding voters how he was born in a house his father had built.

“Probably the idea that is most attractive to an average voter, and an idea that both Republicans and Democrats try to craft into their messages, is this idea that you can rise from nothing,” said Charles C. W. Cooke, a writer for National Review.

There is a certain delight Republicans take in turning that message to their advantage now.

“That’s what Obama did with Hillary,” Mr. Cooke said. “He acknowledged it openly: ‘This is ridiculous. Look at me, this one-term senator with dark skin and all of America’s unsolved racial problems, running against the wife of the last Democratic president.”

Imagine an elite professional services firm with a high-performing, workaholic culture. Everyone is expected to turn on a dime to serve a client, travel at a moment’s notice, and be available pretty much every evening and weekend. It can make for a grueling work life, but at the highest levels of accounting, law, investment banking and consulting firms, it is just the way things are.

Except for one dirty little secret: Some of the people ostensibly turning in those 80- or 90-hour workweeks, particularly men, may just be faking it.

Many of them were, at least, at one elite consulting firm studied by Erin Reid, a professor at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business. It’s impossible to know if what she learned at that unidentified consulting firm applies across the world of work more broadly. But her research, published in the academic journal Organization Science, offers a way to understand how the professional world differs between men and women, and some of the ways a hard-charging culture that emphasizes long hours above all can make some companies worse off.

Photo
 
Credit Peter Arkle

Ms. Reid interviewed more than 100 people in the American offices of a global consulting firm and had access to performance reviews and internal human resources documents. At the firm there was a strong culture around long hours and responding to clients promptly.

“When the client needs me to be somewhere, I just have to be there,” said one of the consultants Ms. Reid interviewed. “And if you can’t be there, it’s probably because you’ve got another client meeting at the same time. You know it’s tough to say I can’t be there because my son had a Cub Scout meeting.”

Some people fully embraced this culture and put in the long hours, and they tended to be top performers. Others openly pushed back against it, insisting upon lighter and more flexible work hours, or less travel; they were punished in their performance reviews.

The third group is most interesting. Some 31 percent of the men and 11 percent of the women whose records Ms. Reid examined managed to achieve the benefits of a more moderate work schedule without explicitly asking for it.

They made an effort to line up clients who were local, reducing the need for travel. When they skipped work to spend time with their children or spouse, they didn’t call attention to it. One team on which several members had small children agreed among themselves to cover for one another so that everyone could have more flexible hours.

A male junior manager described working to have repeat consulting engagements with a company near enough to his home that he could take care of it with day trips. “I try to head out by 5, get home at 5:30, have dinner, play with my daughter,” he said, adding that he generally kept weekend work down to two hours of catching up on email.

Despite the limited hours, he said: “I know what clients are expecting. So I deliver above that.” He received a high performance review and a promotion.

What is fascinating about the firm Ms. Reid studied is that these people, who in her terminology were “passing” as workaholics, received performance reviews that were as strong as their hyper-ambitious colleagues. For people who were good at faking it, there was no real damage done by their lighter workloads.

It calls to mind the episode of “Seinfeld” in which George Costanza leaves his car in the parking lot at Yankee Stadium, where he works, and gets a promotion because his boss sees the car and thinks he is getting to work earlier and staying later than anyone else. (The strategy goes awry for him, and is not recommended for any aspiring partners in a consulting firm.)

A second finding is that women, particularly those with young children, were much more likely to request greater flexibility through more formal means, such as returning from maternity leave with an explicitly reduced schedule. Men who requested a paternity leave seemed to be punished come review time, and so may have felt more need to take time to spend with their families through those unofficial methods.

The result of this is easy to see: Those specifically requesting a lighter workload, who were disproportionately women, suffered in their performance reviews; those who took a lighter workload more discreetly didn’t suffer. The maxim of “ask forgiveness, not permission” seemed to apply.

It would be dangerous to extrapolate too much from a study at one firm, but Ms. Reid said in an interview that since publishing a summary of her research in Harvard Business Review she has heard from people in a variety of industries describing the same dynamic.

High-octane professional service firms are that way for a reason, and no one would doubt that insane hours and lots of travel can be necessary if you’re a lawyer on the verge of a big trial, an accountant right before tax day or an investment banker advising on a huge merger.

But the fact that the consultants who quietly lightened their workload did just as well in their performance reviews as those who were truly working 80 or more hours a week suggests that in normal times, heavy workloads may be more about signaling devotion to a firm than really being more productive. The person working 80 hours isn’t necessarily serving clients any better than the person working 50.

In other words, maybe the real problem isn’t men faking greater devotion to their jobs. Maybe it’s that too many companies reward the wrong things, favoring the illusion of extraordinary effort over actual productivity.

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